Tag - Air Purifier Buying Guide

Outdoor Air Purifier Makes Your Wait for the Bus 40% Less Smoggy

China’s campaign to wipe out air pollution reduced the levels of dangerous particulate matter in the air by 11 percent last year, according to the Ministry of Environment. But the country still has a long way to go before the air its citizens breathe every day can be considered healthy. Only eight out of the 74 cities surveyed met basic national air quality standards.

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In the meantime, public awareness is rising. Pollution masks are hot commodities and startups making new models for indoor air purifiers are driving prices down. Now, a new invention currently being tested in Hong Kong claims it can reduce air pollution in an open outdoor space by an average of 40 percent (h/t to Techweb).

Under the prototype of the patent-pending system, air is drawn into the system from the inlet located at bottom. The air current then passes through a bag filter, which is effective in removing fine suspended particles (PM10 and PM2.5), before coming out through the Louvre overhead.

Hong Kong has been testing 2 meter-by-3 meter purification station on one of its busiest streets, queen’s Road East in Causeway Bay, since March. Sino Green tells Tech in Asia one unit costs HKD 600,000 (US$77,400 million). (Update: an earlier version of this story referenced the Techweb article that said the project cost US$10 million to develop. Sino Green has informed us that figure is not accurate.)

Air quality at the station can be monitored remotely. Further planned enhancements include smart controllers to manage operating hours more efficiently, solar panels for energy, and a mist cooling system for summer months.

Techweb says the City Air Purification System will be tested at Beijing’s Tsinghua University next. If all goes as expected, it could expand to other mainland cities in the future.

Italian man’s portable air purifier bedazzles onlookers

Deal with it. That’s the typical mentality most of the Chinese people have every time the air pollution gets worse.

But this Italian young man was apparently not happy about the status quo.

On Wednesday, he was spotted carrying a self-made air purifier, while riding on a bike in Chengdu, Sichuan Province.

According to the man, who called himself Mike, it cost him about 1,500 yuan($245) to build the device, using a home air purifier and attaching an oxygen mask to it.

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Moreover, he also installed a storage battery and inverter as power supply.

According to experts, it’s possible to convert room air cleaners into portable air purifiers.

However, even if it’s technically possible to do so, experts say it is quite unlikely to achieve the same effectiveness in air filtering as a good breathing mask can do.

And even in developed countries, where the air quality is much better, an air cleaner needs to exchange the air in a room seven to eight times every hour, in order to maintain desired indoor air quality.

What to Look for When Shopping for an Air Purifier

A lot of people worry about the air they breathe. With all of the cars on the road and factories spewing out toxins, air pollution is pretty bad. What a lot of people don’t realize is that indoor air pollution can be even worse than the pollution outside.

Indoors we have to deal with things like dust, pet dander, mold spores, pollen, volatile organic compounds, fumes from cleaning products and other household chemicals, the list goes on and on. Some of the things floating around in the air inside your home can trigger allergic reactions, and some things can actually make you very sick.

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Because indoor air pollution is such a big problem, buying a good air purifier would be a wise investment and on this page we’re going to tell you what you should look for when shopping for an air purifier.

The classroom should be installed air purifier cited hot.

As schools in Beijing and other parts of northeastern China suspend classes because of the red alert over air pollution, many parents are demanding that air purifiers should be installed for the students.

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With major pollution days becoming more frequent, students are staying home, often without supervision. Their parents say it would be better if their children were in the classroom, and that’s why schools need to install air purifiers.

“Our school bought air filters last year. We did a little fund raising, with each parent throwing in several hundred for that. We’ve already bought two air cleaners for the class, both of which are installed.”

Debate over whether should schools use air purifiers

With the repeat occurrence of smog in China, many parents call for installation of air purifiers in classrooms. Some parents even offered to pay for the purifiers. However it is refused by school authorities. It has caused hot debate over whether air purifiers should enter schools.

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Experts say air purifiers on the market are mostly designed for homes or offices. It still needs evaluation to know if it is useful in classrooms. Education authorities in Shanghai said they will coordinate with relating departments and work for a feasible plan.

Meanwhile, reports said a test has been held in a school in Beijing. After using the air purifier, the level of PM 2.5 in the classroom decreased, but with dozens of students in the enclosed room, the dense of CO2 has passed the healthy standards.

Home air purifier told you what Air Purifiers Do

What exactly does an air purifier do, anyway?

We’re glad you asked! After being introduced to air purifier technology you might wonder, “This is great, but what does my home air purifier actually do?” It’s a great question; understanding what air purifiers do is important for picking the right one.

To Put it Simply: Air Purifiers Clean the Air

Air purifiers clean your air by passing it through a filtering process that is targeted at removing one or more types of pollutants—dust, allergens, odors, chemicals, and so on.

Clean Air = Easier Breathing

If you suffer from allergies, asthma, COPD or another respiratory problem, filtering the air has the effect of removing a hazardous irritants from your environment.

The Bottom Line

The end result is cleaner air, easier breathing, better sleep. For many this is a very real improvement in their overall standard of living.

Air Purifier Buying Guide from home air purifier

The right home air purifier can make a dramatic improvement in your home’s air quality. But choosing an air purifier shouldn’t make your head spin. That’s why we’ve put together some buying guides that will start by explaining the basics, and will then lead you to the air purifier that’s right for you.

How to Buy the Right Air Cleaner

Even the cleanest homes can contain dust, pet dander, pollen, and fumes. If you have chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) or other lung problems, these airborne irritants can make it harder to breathe.

Although it’s impossible to remove all of the particles, a portable air cleaner (also known an an air purifier) may reduce asthma and allergy symptoms.

“Since many people with COPD have sensitive airways and problems with allergies as well, an air cleaner may be worth a try,” says Norman Edelman, MD, chief medical officer of the American Lung Association. “It’s not going to make a huge difference in their illness, but it may be beneficial.”

How to read the label

Air cleaners are tested and rated by the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM), which assigns a number from 0 to 450 known as the Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR) to indicate how quickly a cleaner filters dust, tobacco smoke, and pollen out of the air. The AHAM also suggests the size of the room (in square feet) for which a particular model is best suited.

When shopping for an air cleaner, compare these four key numbers by looking for the AHAM seal, which the association requires manufacturers to display on their packaging. Consumer Reports recommends that you purchase a model with more square-footage capacity than you need, so that you can run the machine effectively on its (quieter) “low” setting.

Electronic air cleaners

Air cleaners that use electrically charged plates known as “electrostatic precipitators” have grown in popularity. These cleaners are very efficient and don’t require replacement filters, but they produce small amounts of ozone, a gas that irritates the lungs and has been shown to exacerbate COPD. “We caution against buying any air cleaner that generates ozone, because ozone is very irritating to the respiratory tract,” says Dr. Edelman. (Another type of air cleaner known as ‘ozone generators’ that purposefully produce ozone should also be avoided, according to both Dr. Edelman and the EPA.)

Though Consumer Reports has expressed the same concerns about ozone, the magazine listed the Friedrich C-90B (left), which retails for around $550, as the top electronic air cleaner in a 2007 test.

HEPA filters

The other main type of air cleaner uses high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. These are effective at removing dust and other irritants from the air, yet they produce no ozone.

High-end HEPA cleaners, such as the Airgle 750 andBlueair 650E, have earned the AHAM’s top CADR score and are rated for rooms as large as 26-by-26 feet, but these units typically sell for $800 or more. For a more affordable HEPA room purifier, Consumer Reports has recommended the Hunter Permalife 547 (left), which retails for between $300 and $350.

Be sure to check the price of replacement filters before buying. HEPA filters need to be changed about once a year and can cost $100 or more.

Low-cost clean air

Upgrading the existing filter in your forced-air HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning) system is an inexpensive alternative to room cleaners.

Just as the AHAM does for room cleaners, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers assigns a “minimum efficiency reporting value” (MERV) to filters that measures their effectiveness at removing particles from the air.

Most HVAC systems are equipped with filters of MERV 1 to 4. While most homes cannot accommodate HEPA filters (MERV 17 to 20) because they are too big and dense, filters with a MERV between 7 and 13 are nearly as effective as HEPA filters. Filters in this range, such as those from True Blue (pictured), are available at most hardware and big-box stores for $20 or less.

Online resources

For more information on shopping for air cleaners, check out these valuable online resources:

• The Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers’ comprehensive online directory of Clean Air Delivery Rates; browse by brand, room size, or other criteria.
• The Environmental Protection Agency publication,Guide to Air Cleaners in the Home.
• The Consumer Reports online Air Purifiers Buying Guide.