Tag - clean air purifier reviews

New standards set for air purifiers

A new national standard for air purifiers was unveiled by authorities on Friday to bring order to the country’s chaotic purifier market.

The draft national standard, which is also made available for public comment on Friday, will include more specific metrics for measuring the performance of air purifiers, including their “clean air delivery rate” and endurance, China daily reported on Saturday.

The country’s widespread air pollution problem has given rise to a booming market in air purifiers, with total sales volume reaching 2.4 million units in 2013, the report said.

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However, the market is chaotic with many producers and sellers of air purifiers exaggerating the performance of products and deliberately misleading consumers during promotions, the report said, citing the Beijing Municipal Bureau of Industry and Commerce.

According to a spot check on 20 air purifiers by the Shanghai Bureau of Quality and Technical Supervision in December, only the products of three companies reached their advertised effectiveness or indicated the space in which they would function effectively, according to the report.

The new draft proposes detailed requirements for the labeling of air purifiers. Producers must mark clearly on the product label both the service life and the volume of space for which it can provide effective filtering.

The draft standard includes performance data for both particles and formaldehyde.

The national standard on air purifiers, enacted in 2002 and last revised in 2008, has failed to keep up with the expectations of the public, the report said, citing Song Guangsheng, director of the National Indoor Environment and Indoor Environmental Product Quality Supervision Center.

“The previous national standard on indoor air cleaners did not take into consideration the need for consumers to filter PM2.5 or increased frequency of use,” he said.

PM2.5, particles under 2.5 microns in diameter, is a key indicator of air pollution in China. High density of PM2.5 has also become a major cause to smoggy air conditions that plague many regions in the country in recent years.

 

The Science of Air Purifiers and Health: Is There Data?

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What is one of the hottest gifts in China? Perhaps you could give “the gift that keeps on giving”: an indoor air purifier. They certainly are all the rage in China since last year, with skyrocketing sales and sold-out inventories after the trio of highly publicized airpocalyptic crises. I think this is a good turn of events: plenty of independent testing,including mine, has documented that a good air purifier can dramatically improve your indoor PM2.5 by 80% or more. But is there any good data that proves that this actually makes you healthier? It seems logical, of course, that decreasing exposure to pollution would decrease harmful health effects. But medical history is filled with tales of common sense and tradition that later turn out to be worthless or harmful — like bloodletting, or the more modern tradition of multivitamins. A big percentage of people reading this article take a daily multivitamin, assuming it’s “healthier” to do so, but the best evidence shows they are worthless, and possibly harmful. Could air purifiers be the same?

In theory and in testing, a good purifier should improve a room’s pollution levels more than 80%; this80% reduction is also what the private Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) uses in their clean air delivery rate (CADR) tests, which are widely cited in comparison charts of air purifiers. So let’s say you’ve installed a top-of-the-line purifier in your living room, feeling quite safe and cozy. But how much of your time is actually in that filtered room? Or maybe the purifier is too small for that room size, or the filters are old, or the fan speed is too low, or the windows are open? Even this commonly cited CADR test is just a lab test for only 20 minutes — what about in the real world? I want to take this conversation to the next level, seeking out proof that your health will improve when using these machines. I want to be able to tell my patients and readers that there are published research studies which followed people over many months or even years, compared them to a control group not using air purifiers, and measured their health to see if there was any improvement in heart and lung disease, cancers and death rates. Are there any such studies?258035c025c59745eaab068434d9d6c6

searched the Pubmed scientific database to find the best studies, and I was disappointed but not surprised to find very little strong data. A properly designed research project like this would be very difficult and expensive. But there are a few attempts, especially studies looking at using HEPA filters to help children with asthma. One was a systematic review published in 2002, which found that air filters helped to improve asthma symptoms — but the effect was small, and there was wide variation between studies which made conclusive assessments difficult. A more recent, very well designed study published in Pediatrics in 2011 followed two hundred children with asthma who also were exposed to secondhand smoke at home, and gave half of the kids a true HEPA purifier and the other half a fake purifier for their bedrooms. After a year, the HEPA group of children had less doctor visits for asthma flares, which possibly — but not conclusively — could be due to the 25% decrease in PM2.5 in their homes.

Other studies have focused on allergies, including an interesting study from 2008 which assessed children with documented pet allergies, following them over a year and recording lung function and blood markers. After a year, those who used HEPA air purifiers showed no clear difference in lung function, use of allergy medicines, or blood markers of allergies. Another study back in 1990 was a bit more impressive, showing not only a 70% reduction in indoor PM0.3 but also improved patient symptoms of allergies.

All of these hint at health benefits, but they still dance around the edges of what I want to know for us in China and the developing world. In the USA, most of the air purifier marketing and testing focuses on allergies and asthma. But here in the developing countries, the air pollution is much more severe and thus the health risks are far more serious. We are worried about pollution’s long-term risks of death, heart and lung disease and cancer. These studies I just mentioned still aren’t answering that deeper question: can long-term use of indoor air purifiers prevent death, heart and lung disease, and cancer?

The best study I found was published in January 2013 in Indoor Air. It was very well designed for this complicated type of study, being a randomized double-blind crossover study of 20 homes over three weeks, using an air purifier or a placebo purifier. Their main goal in this remote First Nations community in Canada was to assess whether air purifiers could improve cardiorespiratory health. As their abstract says,

“…each home received an electrostatic air filter and a placebo filter for 1 week in random order, and lung function, blood pressure, and endothelial function measures were collected at the beginning and end of each week… On average, air filter use was associated with a 217-ml increase in forced expiratory volume in 1 second, a 7.9-mm Hg decrease in systolic blood pressure, and a 4.5-mm Hg decrease in diastolic blood pressure. Consistent inverse associations were also observed between indoor PM2.5 and lung function. In general, our findings suggest that reducing indoor PM2.5 may contribute to improved lung function in First Nations communities.”

This same Canadian research team had earlierpublished a similar study, testing 45 non-smokers for 7 days in 20 homes that used wood stoves, comparing health effects with or without HEPA purifiers. The people using the filters showed improved endothelial function and biomarkers of inflammation such as CRP. As most pollution researchers now see pollution as a pro-inflammatory disease, testing for such biomarkers could indeed be an accurate surrogate for later health problems. This approach is also being used in studies of air pollution masks, which I recently reviewed.

My take from these studies? Firstly, they all confirm what we already know: air purifiers can reduce the levels of indoor PM2.5, but with a wide range of effectiveness. Secondly are the more important results looking at health markers. I think the most encouraging finding was the First Nation study showing improvement in lung function, even in such a short amount of time (less than a month). Their data was a bit less convincing on blood pressure improvements, but perhaps a larger study would help confirm their initial findings of a slight improvement.

None of these studies are slam-dunk proof for me, but I honestly don’t know whether we ever will get many more well designed studies like these, unless governmental researchers or Gates-type philanthropists fund them. But until better studies come along, we must rely on what we do know:

  • Air pollution contains many chemicals, but PM2.5 is considered to be the most harmful to health.
  • There is no such thing as a “safe” level of PM2.5. Lower is always better.
  • Worsening PM2.5 causes deaths from all causes, especially heart and lung diseases and cancers. Many studies have shown this, including this 2013 meta-analysis of the population in China.
  • On the brighter side, long-term improvements in PM2.5 do help to decrease mortality. The best study was a huge epidemiological analysis of entire populations in American cities as the air improved from the 1970’s to 1990’s. Lifespans improved for everyone, for a multitude of reasons, and they estimate that 15% of the improved life expectancy was due to cleaner air.
  • Shorter studies have also shown improvements in health from better outdoor air pollution. The best designed study I’ve seen on this happened right here in Beijing, during the 2008 Olympics. A team of researchers followed 125 healthy young doctors before, during and after the Olympics, and found improved blood pressure, heart rate and other biomarkers of inflammation during those lovely days of improved air pollution. Another encouraging studyfollowed pregnant women and their babies in Tongliang, China both before and after a heavily polluting coal-fired power plant was forced to shut down in 2004, and found improved neurodevelopmental scores in newborns at age 2 years.

Is all of this enough to convince you to use an indoor purifier? For me, I was already convinced years ago — it’s not just common sense, it actually makes biochemical sense and also perfectly fits withthe precautionary principle: “When an activity raises threats of harm to the environment or human health, precautionary measures should be taken even if some cause and effect relationships are not fully established scientifically.”

Air Purifier for Spring Allergies

With the peak of the spring allergy season fast approaching, millions of Americans are keeping their tissue boxes close by. The budding trees and blooming flowers associated with the early return of spring mark an increase in itchy, watery eyes, sneezing and other allergy symptoms.

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Seasonal allergic rhinitis, or “hay fever,” affects more than 20 percent of the people living in the United States, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI). Allergies are triggered by substances called allergens, such as pollen or mold spores. Many trees, grasses and weeds contain small and light pollens that are easily carried by the wind, causing allergy symptoms to flare up in the spring.

Tips for allergy sufferers to find relief during allergy season

  • Do a thorough spring cleaning – windows, book shelves and air conditioning vents collect dust and mold throughout the winter that can provoke allergy symptoms.
  • Use a new filter in your air purifier. If you run your air purifier constantly, monitor your filter for build up.
  • Shower and wash your hair before bed – pollen can collect on your hair and skin.
  • Keep pets off of furniture and out of the bedroom. Pollen can cling to the dog or cat after being outside.
  • Keep car windows closed during peak season. Use air conditioning and point vents away from face.
  • When mowing lawn or gardening, wear a filter mask.

Italian man’s portable air purifier bedazzles onlookers

Deal with it. That’s the typical mentality most of the Chinese people have every time the air pollution gets worse.

But this Italian young man was apparently not happy about the status quo.

On Wednesday, he was spotted carrying a self-made air purifier, while riding on a bike in Chengdu, Sichuan Province.

According to the man, who called himself Mike, it cost him about 1,500 yuan($245) to build the device, using a home air purifier and attaching an oxygen mask to it.

Olans air purifier OLS-K04 1

 

Moreover, he also installed a storage battery and inverter as power supply.

According to experts, it’s possible to convert room air cleaners into portable air purifiers.

However, even if it’s technically possible to do so, experts say it is quite unlikely to achieve the same effectiveness in air filtering as a good breathing mask can do.

And even in developed countries, where the air quality is much better, an air cleaner needs to exchange the air in a room seven to eight times every hour, in order to maintain desired indoor air quality.

What to Look for When Shopping for an Air Purifier

A lot of people worry about the air they breathe. With all of the cars on the road and factories spewing out toxins, air pollution is pretty bad. What a lot of people don’t realize is that indoor air pollution can be even worse than the pollution outside.

Indoors we have to deal with things like dust, pet dander, mold spores, pollen, volatile organic compounds, fumes from cleaning products and other household chemicals, the list goes on and on. Some of the things floating around in the air inside your home can trigger allergic reactions, and some things can actually make you very sick.

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Because indoor air pollution is such a big problem, buying a good air purifier would be a wise investment and on this page we’re going to tell you what you should look for when shopping for an air purifier.

The classroom should be installed air purifier cited hot.

As schools in Beijing and other parts of northeastern China suspend classes because of the red alert over air pollution, many parents are demanding that air purifiers should be installed for the students.

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With major pollution days becoming more frequent, students are staying home, often without supervision. Their parents say it would be better if their children were in the classroom, and that’s why schools need to install air purifiers.

“Our school bought air filters last year. We did a little fund raising, with each parent throwing in several hundred for that. We’ve already bought two air cleaners for the class, both of which are installed.”

Home air purifier:why use hepa filter?

Guangzhou Olansi has conducted testing and research on several models of home air purifiers and filters, using a specialty laser particle counter to measure the percentage of particles removed from the air. Here are the key fact you need to know about HEPA technology and its use in air purifier and HVAC filters.

Why HEPA?

High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters are proven to be the most trusted filter technology on the market. The key to HEPA Filters is its tightly woven composition, making them an effective and safe solution to remove airborne particles that can aggravate:

  • Allergies
  • Athma attacks
  • Chemical sensitivity
  • Settling dust
  • Mold growth
  • Pet-related allergies and odor
  • Smoke odor
  • Illnesses linked to viruses & bacteria
  • Long term respiratory health problems

    How does HEPA work?

    HEPA Material

    HEPA is a flat, pleated sheet composed of millions of microscopic fiberglass threads, forming a complex maze which traps airborne particles.

    Because particles 0.3 microns are the weakest point of the filter’s performance, a filter is only classified as HEPA if it removes 99.97% of particles that are 0.3 microns.

     

    Three types of capture

    Interception

    As particles flow by, they are attracted and stick to nearby HEPA filter fibers.

    Impaction

    Air flows smoothly around filter fibers, but particles collide and get embedded.

    Diffusion

    Microscopic particles move erratically, increasing the likelihood of being captured by interception or impaction.

    Olansi K08C Air Purifier

    Olansi K08C Air Purifier

    How does HEPA compare to HVAC filtration?

    HEPA filters have the highest level of filtering available. Most home HVAC systems are not designed to handle the strain of the high resistance filtering of a HEPA filter, so an HVAC filter with a tight weave may reduce air flow and ultimately lower air quality. HVAC filters come in different MERV ratings,but even the most efficient MERV-rated HVAC filter is less efficient than an HEPA air purifier. If HEPA filtration is required, we recommend an air purifier.

How to maintain air purifier?

The pre-filter (typically back cover) after using for a long time, will gather some of the dust, thus affect air inlet and air purification effect. Therefore, need to use a vacuum cleaner to suck away the dust, or use a rag to clean up, or even water to wash.
The filters,some of the filters need to be periodically exposed under sun to better maintain the purification efficiency, such as activated carbon filters.
Deodorizing filter, some brands’ odor removal filter can be water washed. Can maintain longer filter lift time by washing filters with water.

The ion generator, generally it is built-in, does not require cleaning, ion generator with good quality can , it’s efficiency are high.
4. Air purifier dust filter dust collection plates need regular cleaning, general cleaning once a week. Wash dust filter or collection plates with soap, install it after they are dry to keep the airflow smooth and sanitation.

Olansi K15B Air Purifier

Olansi K15B Air Purifier

Need to clean fan or electrode when they accumulate certain amount of dust. General maintenance every six months. Use long-haired brush to remove dust on fan or electrodes. When the air purifier is not in use, should clean it and then packed into the box, stored in a ventilated, dry place. Usually should pay attention to moisture, so as not to reduce the efficiency due to damp or damaged.