Author - Guangzhou Olansi Healthcare Co.,Ltd

New standards set for air purifiers

A new national standard for air purifiers was unveiled by authorities on Friday to bring order to the country’s chaotic purifier market.

The draft national standard, which is also made available for public comment on Friday, will include more specific metrics for measuring the performance of air purifiers, including their “clean air delivery rate” and endurance, China daily reported on Saturday.

The country’s widespread air pollution problem has given rise to a booming market in air purifiers, with total sales volume reaching 2.4 million units in 2013, the report said.

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However, the market is chaotic with many producers and sellers of air purifiers exaggerating the performance of products and deliberately misleading consumers during promotions, the report said, citing the Beijing Municipal Bureau of Industry and Commerce.

According to a spot check on 20 air purifiers by the Shanghai Bureau of Quality and Technical Supervision in December, only the products of three companies reached their advertised effectiveness or indicated the space in which they would function effectively, according to the report.

The new draft proposes detailed requirements for the labeling of air purifiers. Producers must mark clearly on the product label both the service life and the volume of space for which it can provide effective filtering.

The draft standard includes performance data for both particles and formaldehyde.

The national standard on air purifiers, enacted in 2002 and last revised in 2008, has failed to keep up with the expectations of the public, the report said, citing Song Guangsheng, director of the National Indoor Environment and Indoor Environmental Product Quality Supervision Center.

“The previous national standard on indoor air cleaners did not take into consideration the need for consumers to filter PM2.5 or increased frequency of use,” he said.

PM2.5, particles under 2.5 microns in diameter, is a key indicator of air pollution in China. High density of PM2.5 has also become a major cause to smoggy air conditions that plague many regions in the country in recent years.

 

Air Purifier for Winter Allergies

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Allergy & asthma tips for the holidays

The holiday season holds several potential triggers for allergy and asthma sufferers. Whether it’s setting up your Christmas tree, visiting your pet-owning relatives, or feasting on holiday treats, allergy triggers may be lurking around every corner.

“With hectic schedules and constant traveling around the holidays, it’s easy to forget to take proper care when dealing with allergies and asthma,” said Wanda Phipatanakul, MD, MS, FAAAAI, vice-chair of the AAAAI’s Indoor Allergen Committee. “Remembering to take medication and avoid potential triggers is necessary to keep symptoms under control.”

Tips for an Allergy-Free Holiday Season

Before decorating a live Christmas tree, allow it to dry out on an enclosed porch or garage. You also may want to explore whether the tree retailer has a shaking machine, which will physically remove some allergens from the tree.

  • Clean artificial Christmas trees outside before decorating. They can gather mold and dust in storage.
  • Change the filter in your air purifier.
  • Wash fabric decorations in hot, soapy water before displaying.
  • Use plastic, metal or glass decorations that cannot trap dust mites.
  • When spraying artificial snow on windows or other surfaces, be sure to follow directions. These sprays can irritate your lungs if you inhale them.
  • If visiting relatives’ homes who have pets, take medication before arriving to minimize a possible reaction.
  • The holidays can be a very stressful time of year. Pay attention to your stress level, which can sometimes lead to an asthma attack.
  • Ask your relatives and friends to avoid burning wood in the fireplace. The smoke can trigger an asthma attack.
  • Dust mites can be especially troubling when traveling away from home, take a desktop air purifier and your own pillow with an allergen-proof cover and request down-free pillows if staying in a hotel.

Understanding the Pros and Cons of DIY Air purifier

Impurities in the air are a concern to anyone who wants to avoid respiratory problems, and installing an air purifier as a do it yourself project is an option worth considering. Given the low cost budget required to set up your own air purifier, this option has emerged as one popular option in many poorer cities where majority of the population find such leading air purifier as IQAir to be way too unaffordable.

Some concerns that you may encounter can delay or derail a project, and anticipating what can go wrong helps you find a way around typical problems. By conducting an air purifier review, you can find the best air purifier for your purposes.

So, should you choose to jump into it and start making your own DIY air purifier? Few considerations are important which you might want to ponder a little more before rushing your decision.

What are those considerations? Read on to learn more.

Pros and Cons of DIY Air Purifier

What Air Purification Power Do You Need?

To get the most effective results from your efforts, you need one that can treat the entire interior of your home or one that is suitable for one room. A system that can clean the air in your whole house may require duct-mounted units or several room air purifiers.

Room units may cover a space as small as 80 square feet or as large as 800. The advantage of using a room air purifier is that the cost for one unit is less than that for treating an entire residence. The disadvantage is that it may not remove as many air particles as one that treats a larger area.

So, knowing what kind of air purification efficiency you need is the first thing you need to ask yourself.

Quality of Your DIY Unit

The poor quality of air in some areas of China is notorious, and it poses serious threats to health. Bloomberg Businessweek recently reported on the efforts of aFulbright scholar to design and build an air purifier for his home.

Living in China for a year led him to investigate the components of air purifiers, and his research led to the development of a simple system. The basic components consisted of a HEPA filter and a fan, and he fashioned a Velcro strap to secure them together.

Testing the effectiveness of his invention required an investment in a monitor, but the results were impressive. By strapping the filter to the flat surface of an ordinary fan, he reduced PM.05 levels indoors by nearly 85 percent. Levels of PM 2.5 indoors fell by more than 90 percent.

From the picture and demonstration, constructing your own DIY air purifier appears like such a simple thing. But getting down right to do it yourself is another thing which might be more challenging that it seems.

One thing you want to keep in mind is the quality of your fan. Some fans are more powerful than others and they run on better quality motor. Think about it. How long do you think your fan will last if you have to turn it on 24×7? Does it have enough power to deliver the kind of CADR rate that top-rated air purifiers for smoke removalin the likes of Rabbit Air MinusA2 is able to deliver?

The Science of Air Purifiers and Health: Is There Data?

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What is one of the hottest gifts in China? Perhaps you could give “the gift that keeps on giving”: an indoor air purifier. They certainly are all the rage in China since last year, with skyrocketing sales and sold-out inventories after the trio of highly publicized airpocalyptic crises. I think this is a good turn of events: plenty of independent testing,including mine, has documented that a good air purifier can dramatically improve your indoor PM2.5 by 80% or more. But is there any good data that proves that this actually makes you healthier? It seems logical, of course, that decreasing exposure to pollution would decrease harmful health effects. But medical history is filled with tales of common sense and tradition that later turn out to be worthless or harmful — like bloodletting, or the more modern tradition of multivitamins. A big percentage of people reading this article take a daily multivitamin, assuming it’s “healthier” to do so, but the best evidence shows they are worthless, and possibly harmful. Could air purifiers be the same?

In theory and in testing, a good purifier should improve a room’s pollution levels more than 80%; this80% reduction is also what the private Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) uses in their clean air delivery rate (CADR) tests, which are widely cited in comparison charts of air purifiers. So let’s say you’ve installed a top-of-the-line purifier in your living room, feeling quite safe and cozy. But how much of your time is actually in that filtered room? Or maybe the purifier is too small for that room size, or the filters are old, or the fan speed is too low, or the windows are open? Even this commonly cited CADR test is just a lab test for only 20 minutes — what about in the real world? I want to take this conversation to the next level, seeking out proof that your health will improve when using these machines. I want to be able to tell my patients and readers that there are published research studies which followed people over many months or even years, compared them to a control group not using air purifiers, and measured their health to see if there was any improvement in heart and lung disease, cancers and death rates. Are there any such studies?258035c025c59745eaab068434d9d6c6

searched the Pubmed scientific database to find the best studies, and I was disappointed but not surprised to find very little strong data. A properly designed research project like this would be very difficult and expensive. But there are a few attempts, especially studies looking at using HEPA filters to help children with asthma. One was a systematic review published in 2002, which found that air filters helped to improve asthma symptoms — but the effect was small, and there was wide variation between studies which made conclusive assessments difficult. A more recent, very well designed study published in Pediatrics in 2011 followed two hundred children with asthma who also were exposed to secondhand smoke at home, and gave half of the kids a true HEPA purifier and the other half a fake purifier for their bedrooms. After a year, the HEPA group of children had less doctor visits for asthma flares, which possibly — but not conclusively — could be due to the 25% decrease in PM2.5 in their homes.

Other studies have focused on allergies, including an interesting study from 2008 which assessed children with documented pet allergies, following them over a year and recording lung function and blood markers. After a year, those who used HEPA air purifiers showed no clear difference in lung function, use of allergy medicines, or blood markers of allergies. Another study back in 1990 was a bit more impressive, showing not only a 70% reduction in indoor PM0.3 but also improved patient symptoms of allergies.

All of these hint at health benefits, but they still dance around the edges of what I want to know for us in China and the developing world. In the USA, most of the air purifier marketing and testing focuses on allergies and asthma. But here in the developing countries, the air pollution is much more severe and thus the health risks are far more serious. We are worried about pollution’s long-term risks of death, heart and lung disease and cancer. These studies I just mentioned still aren’t answering that deeper question: can long-term use of indoor air purifiers prevent death, heart and lung disease, and cancer?

The best study I found was published in January 2013 in Indoor Air. It was very well designed for this complicated type of study, being a randomized double-blind crossover study of 20 homes over three weeks, using an air purifier or a placebo purifier. Their main goal in this remote First Nations community in Canada was to assess whether air purifiers could improve cardiorespiratory health. As their abstract says,

“…each home received an electrostatic air filter and a placebo filter for 1 week in random order, and lung function, blood pressure, and endothelial function measures were collected at the beginning and end of each week… On average, air filter use was associated with a 217-ml increase in forced expiratory volume in 1 second, a 7.9-mm Hg decrease in systolic blood pressure, and a 4.5-mm Hg decrease in diastolic blood pressure. Consistent inverse associations were also observed between indoor PM2.5 and lung function. In general, our findings suggest that reducing indoor PM2.5 may contribute to improved lung function in First Nations communities.”

This same Canadian research team had earlierpublished a similar study, testing 45 non-smokers for 7 days in 20 homes that used wood stoves, comparing health effects with or without HEPA purifiers. The people using the filters showed improved endothelial function and biomarkers of inflammation such as CRP. As most pollution researchers now see pollution as a pro-inflammatory disease, testing for such biomarkers could indeed be an accurate surrogate for later health problems. This approach is also being used in studies of air pollution masks, which I recently reviewed.

My take from these studies? Firstly, they all confirm what we already know: air purifiers can reduce the levels of indoor PM2.5, but with a wide range of effectiveness. Secondly are the more important results looking at health markers. I think the most encouraging finding was the First Nation study showing improvement in lung function, even in such a short amount of time (less than a month). Their data was a bit less convincing on blood pressure improvements, but perhaps a larger study would help confirm their initial findings of a slight improvement.

None of these studies are slam-dunk proof for me, but I honestly don’t know whether we ever will get many more well designed studies like these, unless governmental researchers or Gates-type philanthropists fund them. But until better studies come along, we must rely on what we do know:

  • Air pollution contains many chemicals, but PM2.5 is considered to be the most harmful to health.
  • There is no such thing as a “safe” level of PM2.5. Lower is always better.
  • Worsening PM2.5 causes deaths from all causes, especially heart and lung diseases and cancers. Many studies have shown this, including this 2013 meta-analysis of the population in China.
  • On the brighter side, long-term improvements in PM2.5 do help to decrease mortality. The best study was a huge epidemiological analysis of entire populations in American cities as the air improved from the 1970’s to 1990’s. Lifespans improved for everyone, for a multitude of reasons, and they estimate that 15% of the improved life expectancy was due to cleaner air.
  • Shorter studies have also shown improvements in health from better outdoor air pollution. The best designed study I’ve seen on this happened right here in Beijing, during the 2008 Olympics. A team of researchers followed 125 healthy young doctors before, during and after the Olympics, and found improved blood pressure, heart rate and other biomarkers of inflammation during those lovely days of improved air pollution. Another encouraging studyfollowed pregnant women and their babies in Tongliang, China both before and after a heavily polluting coal-fired power plant was forced to shut down in 2004, and found improved neurodevelopmental scores in newborns at age 2 years.

Is all of this enough to convince you to use an indoor purifier? For me, I was already convinced years ago — it’s not just common sense, it actually makes biochemical sense and also perfectly fits withthe precautionary principle: “When an activity raises threats of harm to the environment or human health, precautionary measures should be taken even if some cause and effect relationships are not fully established scientifically.”

Fighting Childhood Asthma with an Air Purifier

 

 

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Fighting Childhood Asthma with an Air Purifier

Early detection is the first step in fighting childhood asthma

Does your child experience shortness of breath or irregular breathing? Do you notice a whistling sound when he or she exhales? Does your child have a persistent cough? If so, there is a good chance he or she may be developing asthma, one of the most serious chronic diseases in children and adolescents, affecting nearly nine million children under the age of 18.

According to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI), 50-80% of asthmatics develop symptoms before the age of five. This is why early detection and working with your child’s asthma specialist is important. Untreated asthma can lead to permanent damage to the airways making it difficult to bring the condition under control.

“Children whose immune systems are not fully developed are most at risk for developing asthma,” said Christopher C. Randolph, MD, FAAAI, and Vice-Chair of the AAAAI’s Asthma Diagnosis and Treatment Interest Section. “However, with early detection, the disease is easier to bring under control, improving the quality of life for your child.”

Look, Listen & Learn

There are no clear markers to predict who will develop asthma and who won’t. However, there are clues and symptoms you can look and listen for in your child that may indicate asthma. Ask yourself these questions:

  • Does your child have allergies? The relationship between asthma and allergies is very strong. If your child has allergies, be on the look out for potential signs of childhood asthma.
  • Does your child cough or clear his/her throat often, even when they aren’t sick? This could be constant or just intermittent. Not all children who have the disease exhibit symptoms each and every day.
  • Does he/she wheeze or is there a whistling sound when your child exhales or with upper respiratory infections?
  • Do you notice shortness of breath, rapid or irregular breathing in your child?
  • Does your child complain of chest tightness? A young child may say his/her chest “hurts” or “feels funny.”
  • Does your child seem fatigued? A child might slow down, stop playing or become easily irritated.
  • Does your child have problems sleeping because of nighttime coughing or difficulty breathing?
  • Is there a family history of asthma and/or allergies?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions and you suspect that your child has asthma, schedule an appointment with an asthma specialist, such as an allergist/immunologist, a physician specially trained to manage and treat asthma and allergies. An allergist/immunologist will work closely with you to create a daily management plan for your child, demonstrate proper medication use, and develop an asthma action plan, which outlines the actions to take if your child’s condition worsens.

Learn

While there is no cure for asthma, complete control of the disease can be obtained with appropriate management and treatment. Learning your child’s asthma triggers and what steps to take to decrease symptoms is an important step to keep your child’s asthma under control. Children whose asthma is properly controlled should be able to participate in regular activities such as attending school every day and playing sports.

 

Beijing plans to make the installation of air purifiers

Beijing plans to make the installation of air purifiers part of its school construction standards to tackle frequent smoggy weather in the capital, local education authorities said Thursday.

Several government departments, including the Beijing Municipal Commission of Education (BMCE), are working to draft the city’s school construction standards, which will include the installation of air purifiers, said BMCE director Xian Lianping, the Beijing Times reported Thursday.

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In response to forecasts of heavy smog, Beijing issued two pollution red alerts this winter, under which all the city’s kindergartens, primary and high schools were shut down.

Xian said that the effectiveness of air purifiers in densely packed classrooms has yet to be determined, adding that it is acceptable for schools to independently install air purifiers.

“Installing purifiers in classrooms should ensure students’ safety and should also require parents’ approval,” Xian was quoted as saying.

Parents beset by hazardous smog in Beijing have repeatedly called for primary and high schools to install air purifiers in classrooms, but they have been turned down by schools saying they need approval from education authorities. Some parents even came up with plans to crowdfund air purifiers for their children’s schools, but their efforts were refused.

A small number of some well-funded kindergartens and primary schools have already installed air purification equipment in classrooms, but many more schools cannot afford it due to insufficient budgets.

Hao Xianjun, director of the Shijingshan district’s education commission, told the Beijing Times that schools would turn on their air purification systems on heavily polluted days to lower the concentration of PM2.5 – airborne particles less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter – to below 100 micrograms per cubic meter. Shijingshan Experimental Junior High School will be the first to install such a system when it constructs its new teaching building this year.

During the ongoing fourth session of the 12th Beijing Municipal Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference, many advisors submitted proposals to help schools deal with smog.

Pu Zhe, a member of the committee, said that education authorities should establish a special smog fund to install air purification systems in schools, introduce local regulations on which type of air purifiers to install and launch a unified purchasing platform, the Beijing Times reported.

At Thursday’s session, Xian told committee members that primary and high schools are expected to extend winter vacations and reduce summer vacations, as smog shrouds the capital more frequently in winter, Beijing-based The Mirror newspaper reported on Thursday. Currently, the winter vacation for primary and high schools in Beijing is about one month long.

Air Purifying “Towers” to Come to Beijing

World’s largest air purifier takes on China’s smog. The Smog Free Tower will arrive in China in September, starting with Beijing will create bubbles of clean air in inner-city parks and, Roosegaarde hopes, raise awareness of the dangers of air pollution.

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When artist Daan Roosegaarde visited Beijing in 2014, he was inspired by what he didn’t see.
From his hotel room on the 32nd floor, his view of the sprawling Chinese capital was totally obscured by smog.
“It was all gone,” Roosegaarde says. “The city was completely covered with smog.”
Two years later, he is taking the world’s largest air purifier on a tour of China.
The Smog Free Tower will create bubbles of clean air in inner-city parks and, Roosegaarde hopes, raise awareness of the dangers of air pollution.
Rabbits love clean air, too
The tower has just had a pilot run in Roosegaarde’s hometown of Rotterdam, where his company, Studio Roosegaarde, is headquartered.
It had a surprising effect on the local environment.
“For some reason, little rabbits find the space around the tower particularly intriguing. I don’t know why. Perhaps they can feel the difference,” he says.
Using ion technology, the tower attracts and captures the small pollution particles — PM2.5 and PM10 — and releases clean air, leaving the surrounding area with air that is about 75% cleaner, Roosegaarde says.
“Basically, it’s like when you have a plastic balloon, and you polish it with your hand, it becomes static, electrically charged, and it attracts your hair.”
The seven-meter high tower can clean around 30,000 cubic meters of air each hour, which Roosegaarde says is “a small neighborhood a day.” It runs on just 1,400 watts of power — no more than a tea kettle.
Could these towers save lives?
The tower will arrive in China in September, starting with Beijing.
The tour, a collaboration between Studio Roosegaarde and China’s Ministry of Environmental Protection, will decide its subsequent city stops in China based on the results of a public online vote.
After China, Roosegaarde plans to bring the tower around the world — Mexico City and India are destinations under consideration.
More than 80% of people in urban areas are exposed to air quality levels that exceed World Health Organization limits. As urban air quality declines, the risk of diseases such as strokes, heart disease, lung cancer, and asthma goes up.

 

Build Your Own Air Purifier

In the market for an air purifier? Well, given the winter we are about to close out here in China, you probably (hopefully) are. Would you buy a jacket that doesn’t keep you warm? I hope not, so don’t buy an air purifier that can’t provide you with clean air. The market for air purifiers is exploding and it’s easy to get lost. Stick with us, and we’ll set things straight.

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Ok, I know how the logic goes: so a Blueair 403 will clean 66% as well as a blueair 603 in my living room, and 66% less on most days, is ok, right? Pollution is grimy, like dirty water, and needs to move to be cleaned. A purifier that is too small for a room might do next to nothing. On those bad pollution days, this can really put you at risk of discomfort or illness.

HEPA is a fabric-like material that is used in the construction of air filters. The design and production of the filter itself has a lot to do with its performance. Next time you buy an air purifier, make sure you get to take a look at it. Show you know your stuff by immediately popping the machine open and taking a good hard look at the filter, size, quality of construction, weight. Heavy is good.

You know what I love about buying a new air purifier? Hustling the sales reps for deals on extra filters. Remember, you’re not buying an air purifier to be trendy, you’re buying an air purifier because you want clean, fresh air. Once filters fill up and have been exposed to the world’s toughest pollution for months on end, they kind of, well, die. Buy a least a year’s worth right off the bat, so fresh air is never at the bottom of your to do list.

Home air purifier:Air Purifiers Help Lungs and Heart

Filtering fine-particle pollutants out of indoor air for just 2 days improved markers of cardiorespiratory health in study volunteers, according to a study from China.

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In the randomized, crossover trial, the air purifiers, which were designed to filter out fine particulate matter pollutants (less than 2.5 µm in diameter). achieved and maintained 57% reductions of pollutants during the 48 hours (mean concentration 41.3 µg/m3), reported Renjie Chen, PhD, of Fudan University in Shanghai, and colleagues.

The authors also noted significant reductions in blood pressure and inflammatory biomarkers as well as nonsignificant increases in lung function.

“To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the impact of short-term purification of indoor air on clinical and biochemistry measures of cardiorespiratory health in areas with severe air pollution,” the group wrote in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Shanghai is a city with severe air pollution. Daily outdoor air pollution levels in Shanghai during the study averaged 103 µg/m3, and indoor levels were about the same.

The study involved 35 healthy, nonsmoking college students living in 10 dorm rooms in the city. The rooms were randomized so that half received a functioning air purifier and the other half a sham purifier. The unit was placed in the center of the room and ran for 48 hours. Study volunteers stayed in the rooms with the doors and windows closed during this time.

The researchers evaluated health endpoints and drew blood for analysis after the 48-hour period. After a 2-week washout period, the process was repeated with the sham and functioning home air purifier units reversed.

The blood was analyzed for 14 biomarkers of inflammation, coagulation, and vasoconstriction. All circulating biomarkers decreased in response to the air purification intervention. However, decreases were statistically significant only for sCD40L, a marker of blood coagulation (64.9%, 95% CI 30.3%-82.3%), and for three inflammation markers:

  • MCP-1: 17.5% (95% CI 5.5%-30.8%)
  • Interleukin-1β: 68.1% (95% CI 44.3%-81.7%)
  • Myeloperoxidase: 32.8% (95% CI 5.3%-67.5%)

Systolic blood pressure decreased by 2.7% (95% CI 0.4%-5.1%) and diastolic by 4.8% (95% CI 1.2%-8.5%).

Fractional exhaled nitrous oxide, a marker of respiratory inflammation, decreased by 17% (95% CI 3.6%-32.5%).

The investigators reported modest, nonsignificant improvements in lung function, such as a 3.5% increase in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (95% CI -2.5% to 9.9%). They speculated that these improvements could have become significant if the study had continued longer.

“Although previous studies in countries with cleaner air (Denmark and Canada, etc.) have reported some health benefits due to air filtration, this study provided the first evidence in a country with severe air pollution problems,” Chen told MedPage Today via email.

“Our results showed clear benefits in a much wider range of cardiopulmonary outcomes,” Chen said. “Furthermore, our study found these benefits can be obtained even after a short-term (2-day) use of air purifiers.”

The study had some limitations, namely it was a small and short-term study done in healthy young adults, which may limit the generalizability of the results, and underestimate or miss other potential health effects, Chen explained.

“Bigger health benefits may be expected with long-term air purification and/or in more vulnerable populations (for example, cardiopulmonary patients),” Chen added.

In an accompanying editorial, Sanjay Rajagopalan, MD, of the University of Maryland in Baltimore , and Robert Brook, MD, of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, pointed out that “the evidence to date on the impact of improving indoor air quality has been mostly from the West using air purifiers to improve pollutants attributable to specific sources at relatively lower levels.”

“Added to the results from a few previous studies, these new findings bolster the evidence that improving indoor air filtration may be a practical ‘personalized’ method to reduce overall PM2.5 [fine-particle pollutant] exposure and mitigate adverse health effects,” Rajagopalan and Brook wrote.

“The observed improvement in outcomes, despite particulate levels remaining high during air filtration (41.3 µg/m3) supports the prevailing understanding of a log-linear dose-response relationship between exposure and health effects, whereby any lowering of pollution can translate into benefits, with larger absolute benefits the higher the level of air pollution,” they concluded.

But Darryl Zeldin, MD, scientific director at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), offered some caveats about air purifiers.

Patients who ask about the benefits of air purifiers should be advised that they are only effective in small enclosed rooms, such as a bedroom, and they only remove fine particles such as cigarette smoke or combustion products, he told MedPage Today. “Air purifiers generally don’t work well for larger particles, which include common allergens such as dust mite particles, pollens, and mold because these particles rapidly settle and don’t become airborne again unless they’re disturbed.”

Air purifiers can be recommended in smokers’ homes to remove smoke particles from children’s bedrooms. They can also be recommended for homes with high levels of cat, dog, or mouse allergens, which are relatively small and stay airborne for longer periods of time, he said.

As for the study by Chen’s group, with which Zeldin was not involved, “it’s the first I’m aware of that shows air purifiers might have cardiovascular benefits,” he said. “It’s intriguing, but it’s more of a proof-of-principle study. You would need studies with similar methods in larger populations to bear this out.”

Companies Crowd Air Purifier Market as Airpocalypse Hits China

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At the beginning of Christopher Nolan’s new blockbuster Interstellar, the earth has become an inhabitable dust bowl with lung-choking air. The terrifying dystopia depicted in the movie may cause anxiety in Chinese people, because it’s very similar to what we are experiencing now.

The worsening air quality has sparked a surge in the sales of air purifiers as people desperately try to protect themselves from the smog. The air purifier market size is expected to jump from RMB12 billion (around US$1.93 billion) in 2013 to over RMB20 billion in 2014 and 75 billion in 2015, according to research institute AVC.

The booming market has attracted many companies. Another AVC report noted that the number of domestic air filter manufacturers has soared 450%, from 21 in Q1 2014 to 95 in Q3 in the same year.